concurrent causes

concurrent causes
Causes acting contemporaneously and together causing injury, which would not have resulted in absence of either. Two distinct causes operating at the same time to produce a given result, which might be produced by either, are "concurrent causes"; but two distinct causes, successive and unrelated in an operation, cannot be concurring, and one will be regarded as the proximate and efficient and responsible cause, and the other will be regarded as the remote cause.
See also cause

Black's law dictionary. . 1990.

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  • concurrent causes — Causes acting contemporaneously and together causing injury, which would not have resulted in absence of either. Two distinct causes operating at the same time to produce a given result, which might be produced by either, are concurrent causes ;… …   Black's law dictionary

  • concurrent causes — Two or more causes which run together and act contemporanously to produce a given result or inflict an injury. Stacy v Williams, 253 Ky 353, 60 SW2d 697; Herr v Lebanon, 149 Pa 222, 24 A 207. See concurring cause …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • concurrent negligence — The contributory negligence of the plaintiff in an action for negligence, it and the negligence of the defendant both contributing to produce the injury for which damages are claimed. Dyerson v Union Pacific Railroad Co. 74 Kan 528, 87 P 680. The …   Ballentine's law dictionary

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  • Proximate cause — For the notion of proximate cause in other disciplines, see Proximate and ultimate causation. For causation in English law, see Causation in English law …   Wikipedia

  • proximate cause — That which, in a natural and continuous sequence, unbroken by any efficient intervening cause, produces injury, and without which the result would not have occurred. Wisniewski v. Great Atlantic & Pac. Tea Co., 226 Pa.Super. 574, 323 A.2d 744,… …   Black's law dictionary

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  • cause — noun (Lat. causa.) Each separate antecedent of an event. Something that precedes and brings about an effect or a result. A reason for an action or condition. A ground of a legal action. An agent that brings something about. That which in some… …   Black's law dictionary

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